Tuesday, September 11, 2007

~Excerpt from Three Fallen Women by Amy Guth~



"As legend goes, Sedna, an Eskimo goddess, selective in her men, refused to marry any local suitors, or at all, until a Fulmar bird offered to take her across the sea to his home. Once she arrived, she became miserable and was poorly-treated and begged her father to come take her home. As she and her father were crossing the water, a flock of birds caused a violent storm, and to save his own ass, Sedna's father threw her into the water. Struggling to live, she clung to the edges of the boat, only to have her father chop off her fingers. As Sedna ascended into Eskimo heaven, the severed extremities became the wales, seals an other mammals tht now live i the ocean.

Helen wondered what her own crumbled empire would become as it washed away into the same ocean. She tried on the possibility of a few worthless images, but none of them fit just right. She snuck a few tears once in a laundromat, once in a cab, but stopped both times, as she found herself too confused to voice any of it even to herself."


***We plan to read this book. You caught us.***

4 comments:

Amy Guth said...

"As legend goes, Sedna, an Eskimo goddess, selective in her men, refused to marry any local suitors, or at all, until a Fulmar bird offered to take her across the sea to his home. Once she arrived, she became miserable and was poorly-treated and begged her father to come take her home. As she and her father were crossing the water, a flock of birds caused a violent storm, and to save his own ass, Sedna's father threw her into the water. Struggling to live, she clung to the edges of the boat, only to have her father chop off her fingers. As Sedna ascended into Eskimo heaven, the severed extremities became the wales, seals an other mammals tht now live i the ocean.

Helen wondered what her own crumbled empire would become as it washed away into the same ocean. She tried on the possibility of a few worthless images, but none of them fit just right. She snuck a few tears once in a laundromat, once in a cab, but stopped both times, as she found herself too confused to voice any of it even to herself."

-shamelessly excerpted from "Three Fallen Women" by yours truly

Comrade Kevin said...

The choppy waves off shore signaled the approach of the tropical system. Those braver than ourselves took boards down to the shore, eager to take advantage of the conditions, which produced ideal surfing weather.

I stayed just off shore, my back propped up against the side of a large sand dune. The winds began to pick up and band upon band of torrential rains left deep indentations in the sand. It would rain ferociously for five minutes, then stop, then begin again.

It was my intention to stay as long as possible, to linger until I simply couldn't put up with the torrent. I wanted to feel the full force of nature's fury, to become the personification of man versus nature.

The dune rapidly flooded, and I was forced to take higher ground. By then, visibility was so poor that I could only see about five feet ahead of me. All I could observe was a thick, swirling, frothy soup of swirling water catapulted in every direction imaginable.

Splotchy said...

Every time I feel small I come here.

I feel even smaller as I sit, seeing and hearing the waves hit the beach, but it's a better kind of small.

I do not feel alone. I belong to something.

Chasing Children & Recipes said...

You have some pretty awesome pictures on your blog here. Thanks for a taste of home, the ocean I mean.