Tuesday, September 11, 2007

~History Lesson by Comrade Kevin~


While cleaning out my attic, I found some long-forgotten snapshots taken on one of my trips abroad.

The neo-hippie craze of the late 80's had finally crashed ashore in Beijing. Tye-die was the fashion craze of the moment, and every child proudly wore his or her own tribute to it. I knew that, had they observed it, the aging hippies of San Francisco, circa 1967, would have cringed.

Never in their wildest fantasies could they have anticipated that what was once a form of rebellion had become mainstream. Nor could they have ever dreamed that it would adorn the bodies of a younger generation of kids who spoke no English and had no conception of the Love generation.

Back in the days of flower power, Chinese citizens were forced to wear drab Mao suits, which were designed neither for comfort nor style. These bulky contraptions looked good on no one and gave its wearer the appearance of Frankenstein on the prowl.

The government had recently relaxed its standard of dress, which meant that Chinese citizen were free to adopt Western styles of dress. Massive shoulder pads and the lumpy squarish suits rapidly gave way to t-shirts and jeans.

2 comments:

Rion said...

Today, we can only speculate at the doctrines of the Eravists of the late 20th century, due to the rare archeological remains.

Archival photographs can still be uncovered in the cached and re-cached underbelly of the original, pre-sentience Internet. Many show posed shots of medicine usage, either oral, smoke-inhaled, or injectable. Perhaps these medicines served to enhance their fragile forms. It is estimated that Eravists rarely passed their thirtieth year. Since no other remains can be found of this civilization, we can assume that they were the most adaptable of their generation--however, none reached typical adulthood.

Some artifacts can be found in warehouses to indicate that the rave, or the Eravists' form of worship, included infants and young teens. Bottles crafted of plastic served as medicinal vessels or objects of worship.

If you do happen to come across an electronic or physical artifact that seems Eravist, please bring it immediately to the Anthrocentre for collection, coding, and potential preservation efforts. Namaste.

Comrade Kevin said...

While cleaning out my attic, I found some long-forgotten snapshots taken on one of my trips abroad.

The neo-hippie craze of the late 80's had finally crashed ashore in Beijing. Tye-die was the fashion craze of the moment, and every child proudly wore his or her own tribute to it. I knew that, had they observed it, the aging hippies of San Francisco, circa 1967, would have cringed.

Never in their wildest fantasies could they have anticipated that what was once a form of rebellion had become mainstream. Nor could they have ever dreamed that it would adorn the bodies of a younger generation of kids who spoke no English and had no conception of the Love generation.

Back in the days of flower power, Chinese citizens were forced to wear drab Mao suits, which were designed neither for comfort nor style. These bulky contraptions looked good on no one and gave its wearer the appearance of Frankenstein on the prowl.

The government had recently relaxed its standard of dress, which meant that Chinese citizen were free to adopt Western styles of dress. Massive shoulder pads and the lumpy squarish suits rapidly gave way to t-shirts and jeans.